George Washington Forum News and Events

GWF Events

North Korea: A Defector’s Perspective

Monday, 22 October 2018

7:30 PM | Galbreath Chapel (College Green)

Image of Jinhye Jo (NKinUSA)

Jinhye Jo (NKinUSA)

Jinhye Jo is a North Korean refugee who founded NKinUSA, an organization which tries to rescue other North Korean refugees from China and Southeast Asia. NKinUSA offers extensive resettlement support for those refugees who make it to the United States. It also raises awareness of North Korea’s human rights record. Jo will speak about her own family’s experiences and flight from North Korea as well as her efforts to help other North Korean refugees.

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What is College For?

Thursday, 15 November 2018

7:30 PM | Schoonover Center 145

Image of Kevin D. Williamson (National Review)

Kevin D. Williamson (National Review)

Kevin D. Williamson is National Review’s roving correspondent and director of the National Review Institute’s William F. Buckley Jr Fellowship Program in Political Journalism. He is also the theater critic at The New Criterion. A graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, he began his journalism career at the Bombay-based Indian Express Newspaper Group and spent fifteen years in the newspaper business in Texas, Pennsylvania, and Colorado. He served as editor-in-chief of three newspapers; was the founding editor of Philadelphia’s Bulletin; and worked briefly for The Atlantic. He is a regular commentator on Fox News, CNBC, MSNBC, and NPR.

TBA

Thursday, 6 December 2018

7:30 PM | Galbreath Chapel (College Green)

Image of Ross Douthat (The New York Times)

Ross Douthat (The New York Times)

Ross Douthat has written a twice-weekly opinion column for The New York Times since 2009. Before joining the Times, he was a senior editor at The Atlantic. A graduate of Harvard, he is the author of Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics (2012); Privilege: Harvard and the Education of the Ruling Class (2005); and, with Reihan Salam, Grand New Party: How Republicans Can Win the Working Class and Save the American Dream (2008).

Illiberal Reformers: Race, Eugenics and American Economics in the Progressive Era

Tuesday, 29 January 2019

7:30 PM | Galbreath Chapel (College Green)

Image of Thomas C. Leonard (Princeton)

Thomas C. Leonard (Princeton)

Thomas C. Leonard is Research Scholar in the Council of the Humanities at Princeton University and Lecturer in the Department of Economics, which has twice awarded him the Richard D. Quandt Prize for outstanding teaching. His book, Illiberal Reformers: Race, Eugenics and American Economics in the Progressive Era (2016), won the 2017 Joseph J. Spengler Best Book Prize from the History of Economics Society.

What Was Political Economy?

Thursday, 6 February 2019

7:30 PM | Galbreath Chapel (College Green)

Image of Jason Peacey (University College, London)

Jason Peacey (University College, London)

Jason Peacey is Professor of Early Modern British History at University College, London. He received his PhD from Cambridge University and before coming to UCL, he was a research fellow at the History of Parliament Trust. His publications include Politicians and Pamphleteers: Propaganda during the English Civil Wars and Interregnum (2004) and Print and Public Politics in the English Revolution (2013), in addition to three edited books and dozens of articles and book chapters. He is currently working on print culture in seventeenth-century Europe.

Popular Sovereignty and Populism

15-16 March 2019

8:30 AM–5:30 PM | Baker University Center 240/242

Image of Keith Baker (Stanford), Mark Blitz (Claremont McKenna), Michael Braddick (Sheffield), and Catherine Zuckert (Notre Dame) will deliver plenary lectures

Keith Baker (Stanford), Mark Blitz (Claremont McKenna), Michael Braddick (Sheffield), and Catherine Zuckert (Notre Dame) will deliver plenary lectures

In his Considerations on Representative Government, political theorist John Stuart Mill argues that “the ideally best form of government is that in which the sovereignty, or supreme controlling power in the last resort, is vested in the entire aggregate of the community.” Currently, we live in a moment where some exercises of the people’s power result in what is often called democratic illiberalism. This conference and volume intend to illuminate the concept of popular sovereignty and its related expression, populism. We are especially interested in the crucial continuities and discontinuities in popular sovereignty that emerge when we study critical moments in political history. These include (but are not limited to) the theory and practice of popular sovereignty in the Italian Renaissance; seventeenth-century England; revolutionary and federal America; and revolutionary France.

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Human Capital, Inequality and Economic Growth

Thursday, 18 April 2019

7:30 PM | Galbreath Chapel (College Green)

Image of Kevin Murphy (University of Chicago Booth School of Business)

Kevin Murphy (University of Chicago Booth School of Business)

Kevin Murphy is the George J. Stigler Distinguished Service Professor of Economics at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. He received his PhD from the University of Chicago after graduating from UCLA with an undergraduate degree in economics. He is is the first professor at a business school to be chosen as a MacArthur Fellow and he was the 1997 John Bates Clark Medalist, a prize awarded “that American under the age of forty who is adjudged to have made a significant contribution to economic thought and knowledge.”

God’s Country: Christian Zionism in America

Thursday, 19 April 2018

7:30 PM | Galbreath Chapel (College Green)

Image of Samuel Goldman (George Washington University)

Samuel Goldman (George Washington University)

Samuel Goldman is Assistant Professor of Political Science and Executive Director of the Loeb Institute for Religion Freedom at George Washington University. He received his PhD from Harvard University after completing his undergraduate degree at Rutgers University. Before coming to GWU in 2013, he was the Tikvah Postdoctoral Fellow in Religion, Ethics and Politics at Princeton University. He is also the literary editor of Modern Age and his latest book is God’s Country: Christian Zionism in America (Penn, 2018).

Conference: Voting: A History

13–14 April 2018

9:00 AM–5:15 PM | Faculty Commons, Alden Library (3rd floor) & Baker Center 240

Image of James Ceaser (Virginia), Hedwig Richter (Hamburg) & Yascha Mounk (Harvard)

James Ceaser (Virginia), Hedwig Richter (Hamburg) & Yascha Mounk (Harvard)

This interdisciplinary conference will consider the theory and practice of voting. James Ceaser (Virginia), Hedwig Richter (Hamburg) and Yascha Mounk (Harvard) and will deliver plenary lectures.

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Public Bioethics and Human Dignity

Wednesday, 28 March 2018 (RESCHEDULED)

7:30 PM | Galbreath Chapel (College Green)

Image of Carter Snead (University of Notre Dame Law School)

Carter Snead (University of Notre Dame Law School)

O. Carter Snead is William P. and Hazel B. White Director of the Center for Ethics and Culture and Professor of Law at the University of Notre Dame, where he has taught since 2005. He received his J.D. from Georgetown University after completing his undergraduate degree at St. John’s College in Annapolis, Maryland. After clerking for Judge Paul J. Kelly, Jr., of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit, he served as general counsel to the President’s Council on Bioethics. He is recognized as a leading expert in public bioethics. His research explores issues relating to neuroethics, enhancement, stem cell research, abortion, and end-of-life decision-making. He has authored more than 40 journal articles, book chapters, and essays. His scholarly works appear in such publications as the New York University Law Review, the Harvard Law Review Forum, the Vanderbilt Law Review, Constitutional Commentary, Quaderni Costituzionali, the Yale Journal of Health Policy, Law and Ethics, the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, and Political Science Quarterly.

This event was rescheduled from 7 February owing to inclement weather.

The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics

Tuesday, 5 December 2017

7:30 PM | Galbreath Chapel (College Green)

Image of Mark Lilla (Columbia University)

Mark Lilla (Columbia University)

Mark Lilla is Professor of Humanities at Columbia University. He received his PhD from Harvard University. Before moving to Columbia in 2007, he taught in the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago and at New York University. A regular contributor to the New York Review of Books, he is the author of The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics (2017), The Shipwrecked Mind: On Political Reaction (2016), The Stillborn God: Religion, Politics, and the Modern West (2007),The Reckless Mind: Intellectuals in Politics (2001),and G.B. Vico: The Making of an Anti-Modern (1993). Lilla’s talk is co-sponsored by the George Washington Forum, the Office of Student Affairs and Ohio University’s LGBT Center.

Toleration, Free Expression and Liberalism’s Origins

Thursday, 12 October 2017

7:30 PM | Galbreath Chapel (College Green)

Image of Jeffrey Collins (Queen's University, Canada)

Jeffrey Collins (Queen's University, Canada)

Jeffrey R. Collins is an Associate Professor of History at Queen’s. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1999 and served, for three years, as a Harper Post-doctoral Fellow at the University of Chicago. He has published numerous articles on early modern religion, politics, and political thought, and is regular book reviewer for publications such as the Wall Street Journal and the Times Literary Supplement. His first book, The Allegiance of Thomas Hobbes, was published by Oxford University Press in 2005. He is currently writing a second book on early modern religious conflict and the origins of liberal political order.